TOP AMERICAN CITIES FOR WOMEN-OWNED BUSINESSES

The Growth of Women in Business

The Top 10 Cities For Women-Owned Businesses

Women are conquering the business world at a rapid pace, especially in areas such as small business and entrepreneurship.

The proof? In the last decade, the number of women-owned firms nationwide has grown by over 3.5 million, now representing 38% of all businesses in the United States.

Today’s map shows the top American cities where business is booming for women entrepreneurs.

Where are Women-Owned Businesses Growing Fastest?

Looking at the percentage growth in women-owned businesses tells us a lot about the way local economies have developed in the past decade.

Though women-owned firms in larger cities may have more absolute growth and revenue, a high growth rate shows the rapid emergence of a business community where there may have not been one before.

Rank City Growth as Percentage Absolute Growth Revenue ($ Billion)
1 Memphis 122% 47,798 6.1
2 Detroit 121.4% 140,000 25.1
3 Charlotte 105.4% 61,568 13.3
4 Miami 94.7% 220,000 41.4
5 Orlando 83.5% 72,930 12.3
6 Atlanta 75.8% 133,000 36.9
7 Dallas 74.3% 100,000 47.0
8 Houston 70.4% 107,000 36.1
9 Las Vegas 69.8% 44,341 10.4
10 Austin 65.2% 41,413 10.3

Memphis’ women are leading the charge in the development of their city’s relatively small economy. Though the city is ranked only 45th in terms of revenue generation by women-owned firms, it’s adding new women-owned businesses at a very rapid pace.

The growth rate in Memphis of 122.2% between 2007-2016 leads the nation, making it one of only three cities (along with Charlotte and Detroit) where women-led business growth has more than doubled since 2007.

Absolute Growth Numbers

More metropolitan cities like New York or Los Angeles already have a bigger base of women entrepreneurs to start with, so their percentage growth is not high enough to show up on the aforementioned map.

However, it is worth looking at where the most women-owned businesses are being added (in absolute terms) as well:

Rank City Absolute Growth Growth as Percentage Revenue ($ Billion)
1 New York City 271,000 44.9% 140.0
2 Los Angeles 225,000 55.0% 95
3 Miami 220,000 94.7% 41.4
4 Detroit 140,000 121.4% 25.1
5 Atlanta 133,000 75.8% 36.9
6 Houston 107,000 70.4% 36.1
7 Chicago 105,500 39.0% 50.0
8 Dallas 100,000 74.3% 47.0
9 Riverside 60,000 62.8% 19.9
10 Washington, D.C. 57,000 32.6% 37.1

Interestingly enough, certain cities appear on both lists, showing impressive growth both in relative and absolute terms.

Detroit and Miami are fairly unique in that they make the top five on both lists. Detroit grew its women-owned businesses by 121.4%, or 140,000 in absolute terms. Meanwhile, Miami grew at 94.7% to add 220,000 businesses since 2007.

Houston and Atlanta are two other cities that fare very well on both lists.

Beware the danger of Feminism Lite. It is the idea of conditional female equality. Please reject this entirely. It is a hollow, appeasing and bankrupt idea. Being a feminist is like being pregnant. You either are or you are not. You either believe in the full equality of men and women, or you do not.

Feminism Lite uses analogies like “He is the head and you are the neck.” Or, “He is driving but you are in the front seat.” More troubling is the idea, in Feminism Lite, that men are naturally superior but should be expected to “treat women well.” No. No. No. There must be more than male benevolence as the basis for a women’s well-being.

Feminism Lite uses the language of “allowing.” Theresa May is the British prime minister, and here is how a progressive British newspaper described her husband: Phillip May is known in politics as a man who has taken a back seat and allowed his wife, Theresa, to shine.

Allowed. Now let us reverse it. Theresa May has allowed her husband to shine. Does it make sense? If Phillip May were prime minister, perhaps we might hear that his wife had “supported” him from the background, that she was “behind” him or that she’d “stood by his side,” but we would never hear that she had “allowed” him to shine.

“Allow” is a troubling word. “Allow” is about power. A husband is not a headmaster. A wife is not a schoolgirl. Permission and being allowed, when used one-sidedly — and it is nearly only used that way — should never be the language of an equal marriage. Another egregious example of Feminism Lite: men who say, “Of course a wife does not always have to do the domestic work; I did domestic work when my wife traveled.”

Our world is full of men and women who do not like powerful women. We have been so conditioned to think of power as male that a powerful woman is an aberration. And so she is policed. We ask of powerful women: Is she humble? Does she smile? Is she grateful enough? Does she have a domestic side? Questions we do not ask of powerful men, which shows that our discomfort is not with power itself, but with women. We judge powerful women more harshly than we judge powerful men. And Feminism Lite enables this.

At first glance, woman interrupted may seem like a small problem, but it reflects deeper issues of gender inequality at work and in society. Women struggle every day to get their space in the workplace and the right to express themselves. When they get there, manterrupting reduces their participation. Women want men to ask themselves: Am I doing this without even realizing it? After all, what’s the point of having more women in a meeting room if nobody hears what they have to say?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s