TRAVEL INNOVATIONS REDUCE TIME AND COSTS


 

Concur, an SAP company and the world’s leading provider of travel, expense and invoice management solutions, today announced expanded Concur Travel features to reduce time and costs associated with booking and managing travel, including new TripLink supplier connections, virtual cards, and increased branded fare content. Between 2015 to 2016, Concur reduced the average time it takes users to book air travel by 14 percent, saving businesses an estimated $275 million in labor costs.

“At Concur, our goal is to make travel booking and expense management as easy and seamless as possible,” said Tim MacDonald, Chief Product Officer at Concur. “We’ve found that every second we can take out of the process is worth nearly $1 million. That is money our customers can save and invest back into their business.”

Managing business travel has gone beyond basic booking and Concur’s connected ecosystem brings key data, tools and apps travelers are using together all in one place. This allows travel managers to see and manage travel, while also delivering a more seamless experience to business travelers.

The Concur Travel updates announced today will help travelers further streamline booking and give travel managers greater visibility and policy control, cutting the time and investment necessary to book and manage travel. These include:

  • New TripLink supplier connections and increased adoption: Concur TripLink, the industry’s first platform to enable companies to capture reservations booked outside a corporate travel system, continues to create more efficiencies and closes the duty of care gap. To date, TripLink has captured more than 2 million bookings that otherwise would not have been visible to travel managers. Nearly half of these were captured in just the past 10 months. For TripLink customers, they are now able to see and manage 9% more of their travel than without TripLink.
    As Concur continues to expand its TripLink network, travel managers have greater visibility and control, even with bookings made directly on supplier sites. Most recently, Concur cemented agreements with British Airways, Iberia, and WestJet that enables mutual customers to capture business travel bookings made directly on their websites.
  • Virtual Cards for hotel bookings: Concur will offer virtual cards, powered by Conferma, for users booking hotel accommodations via GDS. By providing a unique payment number for each hotel transaction, virtual cards give travel managers more immediate visibility and control of hotel spend, and reduces the chance of credit card fraud. Over time, Concur plans to offer the ability to pay for other expenses and establish additional virtual card partnerships to expand this capability to even more customers.
  • Branded fares: Concur Travel will feature additional branded fare content which includes major airlines such as American Airlines, Delta, Air France, British Airways, Lufthansa, Air New Zealand (within New Zealand) and more. Branded fares allow business travelers to book low-cost airfares bundled with select travel perks (such as a checked bag or priority booking) and flex options in one purchase.

Concur Travel updates were announced this week at GBTA Convention 2017, the business travel industry’s largest annual event, and will become available on a rolling basis over the coming months in 2017. GBTA Convention attendees can learn more about these latest innovations at booth # 1337.

The travel industry’s rapid evolution continues unabated. To profit through this turbulence, leaders must focus on what really matters—the customer. The landscape of travel distribution has been shifting. Until the mid-1990s, distribution was a straightforward mix of brand call centers, travel agencies, and in-person bookings at the hotel front desk, airline ticket counter, or car-rental outpost. The launch of online booking gave companies a new way to engage with customers and also opened the door to new business models such as online travel agencies (OTAs). However, in the 2000s, most travel suppliers, aggregators, and service providers focused on managing transaction costs rather than improving the customer experience, with serious implications. The game is now about delivering a superior customer experience.

The pace of change has accelerated due to three factors. First, the competitive bar continues to rise. Among OTAs, three leading players—Ctrip, Expedia, and Priceline—have achieved global scale and relevance. And suppliers are seeking a competitive edge through several levers, including loyalty partnerships; building on the foundation set by Delta and Starwood, today’s major travel partnerships include those between Starwood and Uber, United and Marriott, and Qantas and Airbnb, among others. Second, travel technologies—especially mobile platforms—have continued to evolve as customers alter how they browse for and purchase travel. Expedia reports that 40 to 60 percent of its leisure-travel-brand traffic is through mobile devices, and about half of bookings on some brands comes from mobile. Third, potential sources of disruption are on the horizon. For example, business travel currently accounts for 10 percent of Airbnb bookings—but that number is growing, thanks to the company’s integration into the platforms of several leading travel-management companies.

The shifting conditions make it more important than ever to put the customer at the center. But despite some examples of progress, we continue to see companies solve for business requirements over customer needs. Many suppliers are falling short of their potential because they focus on transaction costs instead of lifetime value. And for many intermediaries, earnings expectations, contentious supplier relationships, and an onslaught of digital newcomers have eroded the ability to test, learn, and “fail fast” that helped them identify and solve unmet needs in the first place.

The good news? The path to success is likely more straightforward than it seems. In fact, we see examples of companies implementing some or all of the strategies we will discuss:

  1. Harness advanced analytics to understand the customer better.
  2. Adjust mobile offerings to capture, secure, and serve the customer.
  3. Safeguard against future disruption.

What’s the catch? Unless executives focus relentlessly on solving for customer needs, we will continue to see ineffective promotions, lackluster apps, and uninspired pivots and product launches. Companies that can solve real customer needs, including through partnerships with other members of the travel ecosystem, will position themselves at the vanguard of travel distribution.

From travelers to technology, several significant trends are influencing how companies engage with customers.

Suppliers are emboldened to innovate product development, marketing, and distribution

Intermediaries connect suppliers with consumers, but such bookings come at a cost. Thus, suppliers are pursuing strategies to drive more direct bookings:

  • Launching large-scale marketing campaigns. For example, Hilton’s “Stop Clicking Around” campaign, along with other initiatives, contributed to a 60 percent increase in HHonors enrollments and a shift toward direct channels in the third quarter of 2016.
  • Enhancing direct-channel offerings. AccorHotels has begun distributing independent hotels through AccorHotels.com at up to 14 percent commission and plans to reach more than 8,000 properties over time.
  • Providing disincentives for indirect bookings. In September 2015, Lufthansa implemented a €16 fee for bookings made through global distribution systems (GDSs). While Lufthansa and third parties differ in their assessment of the fee’s impact, the move helps enable a longer-term shift to more dynamic pricing.
  • Consolidating to achieve scale. Among US airlines, mergers over the past ten years have led to four clear leaders with combined 80 percent domestic market share (and Alaska Air recently became the fifth-leading carrier, with 6 percent share, after the acquisition of Virgin America).

While the specific strategy varies by supplier, the trend is clear: suppliers throughout the travel industry are willing to go further than ever to convince customers to book directly.

Three leading OTAs—Expedia, Priceline, and Ctrip—also own (at least for now) the world’s leading metasearch players. Each continues to assume, in its own way, an expanded role in the customer journey:

  • Expedia (which recorded $61 billion in 2015 gross bookings) acquired Orbitz and Travelocity in 2015. It is the clear leader in the United States, with approximately two-thirds OTA market share. It is present in many travel verticals, including metasearch (Trivago), vacation rentals (HomeAway), and corporate travel (Egencia).
  • Priceline ($56 billion in 2015 gross bookings) is the largest player by revenue and market value, given strength in hotels through Booking.com. The clear leader in Europe, it is also present in many travel verticals, including metasearch (Kayak.com), vacation rentals (Booking.com), and restaurant bookings (OpenTable). It owns a 9 percent stake in Ctrip.
  • Ctrip ($27 billion in 2015 gross bookings) is the fastest-growing global OTA, with a growth rate of 58 percent in 2015 alone. It is the clear leader in Chinese domestic and outbound travel and is a mobile leader, with an estimated 70 percent of bookings via app. It is consolidating its position in Asia through stakes in Qunar, eLong, and MakeMyTrip. It also has an expanding presence in many travel verticals, including metasearch (Skyscanner) and tour operators.

These giants, along with Google and TripAdvisor, will continue to play a major role in shaping the future of distribution. In many cases, the relationship between these intermediaries, and between intermediaries and suppliers, is multifaceted. As recently as 2014, analysts estimated that Expedia and Priceline accounted for up to 5 percent of Google’s total ad revenue. Marriott partners with Expedia to sell dynamic travel packages through Vacations by Marriott. And Southwest Airlines’ hotel offerings are provided by Priceline’s Booking.com. The continued evolution of intermediary business models will be critical to watch.

Mobile is increasingly the customer’s channel of choice: by 2019, nearly 80 percent of US travelers who book online will do so via mobile, up from 36 percent in 2014. “Mobile first” has become a favorite catchphrase, but given the massive shift in behavior, travel companies must develop a deep understanding of why and how customers are using mobile. Consider, for example, the following trends:

  • Mobile search is on the rise. In 2015, mobile flight and hotel searches on Google increased 33 and 49 percent year over year, respectively.
  • Mobile plays a critical role after arrival. For instance, 85 percent of leisure travelers choose activities after their arrival, and half of international travelers use their mobile devices to search for such activities after their arrival.
  • Not all mobile experiences are created equal. The average rating of OTA/metasearch apps is 19 percent higher than the average of hotel brand apps.

The industry has seen some recent mobile-focused innovations. These include day-of-travel features such as keyless or app-enabled hotel room entry, in-app passport scanning at check-in, and real-time luggage tracking. Other developments involve context-based design; for example, 24 hours before a scheduled flight, Virgin America’s app shifts from emphasizing booking to focusing on check-in. Finally, a growing list of brands across the value chain—including Booking.com, Cheapflights, Expedia, Hyatt, Kayak, KLM, Lola, and Skyscanner—have introduced messaging platforms and bots.

Looking forward, booking may be the function ripest for innovation, as relatively few players have created a compelling, mobile-friendly booking experience.

The data analytics revolution now under way has the potential to transform how companies organize, operate, manage talent, and create value. That’s starting to happen in a few companies—typically ones that are reaping major rewards from their data—but it’s far from the norm. This truth certainly holds in travel, where a wide range of use cases is emerging:

  • Enhancing commercial effectiveness. Red Roof Inn used analytics on publicly available weather and flight data to predict and target customers facing flight cancellations.
  • Refining customer experience. British Airways’ “Know Me” program, driven partially by Opera Solutions, mines customer data including loyalty information and buying habits to generate targeted offers and experiences.
  • Optimizing network and portfolio. Aloft, for example, is piloting a digital hotel experience, with rooms equipped with Internet of Things–enabled technologies such as intelligent climate control, and using the data generated to support product innovation.
  • Driving operational and administrative efficiency. Hotels are using platforms such as ALICE (which counts Expedia as an investor) to consolidate, track, and analyze guest requests and interactions to improve the quality and speed of operations.

Before embarking on new big data or analytics ventures, it is critical to ensure adequate data security—particularly given the numerous high-profile, highly damaging data breaches in other industries.

The sharing or on-demand economy, exemplified by companies such as Airbnb and Uber, is the most significant business model to emerge and scale over the past five years. The numbers themselves are notable—including rapid growth (Piper Jaffray estimates a 10 percent compound annual growth rate for short-term and peer-to-peer accommodations from 2014 to 2025, versus 3 percent for traditional accommodations ) and valuations (including Uber at $68 billion, Didi Chuxing at $33 billion, and Airbnb at $30 billion ). But more interesting is the degree to which innovative current players continue to innovate:

  • Uber’s expansion continues not only into new cities but also into new modes of transportation. In a recently published white paper, the company laid out the potential for vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft for on-demand transportation, particularly in dense urban networks.
  • Airbnb’s recently announced expansion into Trips (peer-to-peer tours and activities ranging from a few hours to a few days) and Places (including meet-ups with other users, destination guides, local recommendations, audio guides, and eventually, restaurant reservations) represents the latest step in a journey from air mattresses in spare rooms to a “super brand of travel.”

While hospitality and ground transportation have been most heavily disrupted, other modes such as air travel also continue to see innovation from models such as Rise, Surf Air, OneGo, and Set Jet. Beyond the sharing economy, specialized models continue to emerge with a focus on capturing an outsize share of specific segments. For example, Priceline founder Jay Walker’s Upside rewards “free agent” business travelers for flexibility in flight and hotel bookings.

Executives should resist the temptation to be pulled in directions that distract from their top priorities: engaging with customers more effectively, enhancing attraction and retention, and capturing more value throughout the customer life cycle. To begin the process of thinking in terms of customer lifetime value instead of cost per booking, they must answer some fundamental questions:

  • How much is a customer worth? In banking and many other industries, analyzing and predicting a customer’s lifetime value at acquisition is standard operating procedure. In travel, we’ve encountered very few companies that conduct this analysis consistently or at scale, despite the available data on marketing, transactions, loyalty, satisfaction, and referrals.
  • What can every employee do to secure the next purchase? Customer acquisition and retention can no longer be the purview of marketing and sales groups alone. Everything from back-office accounting to human resources to maintenance must be oriented toward enhancing the lifetime value of each customer.
  • How do customer needs and booking scenarios influence the choice of booking channel? Companies must identify and exploit the many “micro moments” in the customer journey. This journey should be mapped starting with the inspiration for the trip and combined with factors such as the customer’s location at point of purchase, the device used, historical preferences, and past experiences to deliver the right offer through the right channel at the right time.
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