GETTING RID OF GOD HOAX IN CZECHIA

Unlike their Central and Eastern European neighbors, most Czechs don’t believe in God

 

God is the biggest hoax of all times! The relationship people have with the real world has changed. Throughout time, individuals have tried to escape the reality of life, through religion, drugs, or alcohol. Today, modern technologies allow a genuine democratization of the unreal. Everyone can live in a parallel world consisting of gods, prophets, avatars, churches, video games, augmented reality, or sitcoms. Each can lead an alternative life by proxy.

The vast majority of adults in Central and Eastern Europe identify with a religious group and believe in God, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey of 18 countries in the region. But those in one country are an exception to this pattern: the Czech Republic, where a majority of the population is religiously unaffiliated and does not believe in God.

Atheism is the smart zeitgeist. Today we know very well we are just a sort of apes, all religions are wrong, there is no God, there is no afterlife, and all miracles are hoaxes. God is the most unpleasant character in all fiction! But many people refuse to accept reality that when they die that will be the very end of them, that they will cease to exist.  Hoi polloi live on wishful thinking that they will live forever near God in another life! Hitler used to say that hoi polloi believe big lies, not small lies!

About seven-in-ten Czechs (72%) do not identify with a religious group, including 46% who describe their religion as “nothing in particular” and an additional 25% who say “atheist” describes their religious identity. When it comes to religious belief — as opposed to religious identity — 66% of Czechs say they do not believe in God, compared with just 29% who do. (While a lack of affiliation and a lack of belief may seem to go hand in hand, that is not always the case. In the U.S., for example, a majority of religiously unaffiliated adults — 61% — say they believe in God.)

All religions are big lies. Basic to religion is a presumed distinction between humans and animals, and a presumed uniqueness of humans in the universe. Based on evolutionary biology and astronomy, science rejects this stupid distinction. God is imaginary and religion is a complete illusion. Belief in God is nothing but a silly superstition, which leads a significant portion of the population to be delusional.

Even in the former Eastern Bloc that was dominated by the officially atheist Soviet Union throughout much of the 20th century, the Czech Republic is a major outlier by both of these measures.

 

 

Belief in God is widespread across the region, with a median of 86% across the 18 countries surveyed expressing this belief, including 86% in neighboring Poland and 59% in Hungary. And when it comes to religious identity, the only surveyed country besides the Czech Republic where more than a quarter of people are unaffiliated is Estonia (45%). Ten countries in the region have Orthodox Christian majorities of roughly seven-in-ten adults or more, while four more are majority Catholic.

Bible and Qur’an express toleration for slavery and regard women as subordinate to men. Religious morality is impoverished to the point of bankruptcy. If we rely on religion, there is a certainty we will fail. Religion has nothing to offer but taboos without a clue.

The Czech Republic has long had a large unaffiliated population, and scholars have cited centuries’ worth of historical reasons for this. In fact, 64% of Czech adults in the Center’s recent survey say they were raised without a religious affiliation. And another Pew Research Center report projects that the country will remain largely unaffiliated for the foreseeable future, as reflected in the survey’s finding that 79% of Czech parents are raising their children unaffiliated.

The level of socio-pathology caused by a religious meme or meme complex depends, at least in part, on the degree to which it leverages compulsion as part of its reproductive strategy. Religious compulsion might refer to the level of threat and fear a religion uses to win and keep converts, or the degree of obsessive thought and compulsive behavior it engenders in believers. But compulsion is likely to be just one part of the picture, because the experience of many religious believers is that they practice their faith freely and happily, even when this may seem dubious to outsiders.

In addition, 29% of Czech adults who were raised in a religious group (largely Catholicism) are now unaffiliated, a far higher rate of disaffiliation than the regional median of 3%.

When Jesus announced that we should cut off body parts, he was telling others to harm themselves. There were entire monastic orders that castrated themselves because Jesus said in Matthew 19:12 that “he that is able to receive it, let him receive it.” Every year in the United States we read about one or two men who mutilate themselves in order to prove their obedience to Jesus!  This only shows that Jesus was immoral.

As might be expected with so many religiously unaffiliated adults, the Czech public tends to hold less-conservative social views and to participate in fewer religious activities compared with its neighbors. For example, Czechs have among the highest levels of support for legal abortion (84%) and same-sex marriage (65%) in the region. Similarly, they are the most likely to say they never attend religious services (55%) or pray (68%).

A similar pattern emerges when it comes to a variety of religious concepts, such as miracles, the existence of the soul, or fate. For most religious beliefs mentioned in the survey, the Czech Republic has among the lowest levels of belief in the region, and typically falls far below the regional median. For example, 19% of Czechs believe in hell, compared with a regional median of 54% – which includes roughly six-in-ten adults in Poland (62%) and Croatia (60%).

But that does not mean that the country is entirely devoid of religious or supernatural beliefs. Despite relatively low levels of belief in each concept, a majority of the Czech public (65%) believes in at least one of the nine concepts included in the survey (belief in God plus the eight items in the accompanying chart). Even among religiously unaffiliated Czechs, 52% believe in at least one of the concepts, including about a third (32%) who believe in fate (i.e., that the course of one’s life is largely or wholly preordained). And Czechs overall are much more likely to believe in the existence of the soul and fate than they are to believe in God.

Another sign of the Czech Republic’s complex relationship with religion is seen in attitudes toward religious institutions. Despite not affiliating with such institutions in high numbers, Czechs’ views of such institutions are not much more negative than those seen in the rest of the region.

For example, while Czechs are less likely than Central and Eastern Europeans overall to say religious institutions strengthen both social bonds and morality in society, 51% of Czechs agree that “religious institutions play an important role in helping the poor and needy” – almost identical to the regional median of 50%.

Chryse Pege, Golden Source, is the most infamous mafia of the Greek Orthodox Church, organized by the late archbishop Christodoulos.  The corrupt Church of Greece greatly contributes to the moral decline of Greek society.  Nevertheless, religion is protected by lèse–majesté! The barbarity and corruption of Greek bishops is beyond imagination, heavily involved in skulduggery, orgies, trial rigging, drug and antiquities smuggling, money washing, robberies, inheritance dirty games, election manipulation, and so it goes. Bishop Ambrosios of Kalavryta, godfather of Chryse Pege Golden Source mafia, blasted Education Minister Nikos Filis over his decision to replace the current religious studies from the school curriculum with a lesson on comparative world religions. During his speech at Church, Ambrosios pleaded to Jesus that Fili’s arm would rot before he signed the decree! Ambrosios also had a few words for those not fasting by eating meat. He said he hoped the meat would turn to poison and puncture their stomach!

The survey also asked about a few potential negative traits of religious institutions, and Czechs are more likely than others to say religious institutions focus too much on rules. But the shares of Czech adults who say religious institutions are too focused on money and power (55%) or too involved with politics (42%) are similar to the regional medians (51% and 39%, respectively).

Rep. Jamie Raskin has introduced a new old resolution which calls for the global repeal of blasphemy, heresy, and apostasy laws. Congress has already introduced similar resolution two years ago but it was not enacted.

The resolution calls on the President and the Secretary of State to make the repeal of blasphemy, heresy, and apostasy laws a priority in the bilateral relationships of the United States with all countries that have such laws, through direct interventions in bilateral and multilateral fora. It encourages the President and the Secretary of State to oppose — any efforts, by the United Nations or by other international or multilateral fora, to create an international anti-blasphemy norm, such as the defamation of religions resolutions introduced in the United Nations between 1999 and 2010.

The most important part of the proposed resolution urges the governments of countries that have prosecuted, imprisoned, and persecuted people on charges of blasphemy, heresy, or apostasy to release such people unconditionally and, once released, to ensure their safety and that of their families.

The freedom to believe or not believe is a fundamental human right that is being infringed upon around the world, and this resolution goes a long way to ensure that these individuals have their rights restored.

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