KING PHILIPPE VERSUS BURGER KING

Burger King sought to promote the late June opening of its first Belgian outlet with a campaign poking a bit of fun at Belgium’s King Philippe. The royal family was very much not amused.

“We told them that we were not happy with them using my image in their campaign,” King Philippe told us.  They should have used the image of Führer Juncker!

 

 

Hitler has won after all!  Germany has managed to enslave all Europeans in EU, the Fourth Reich! Fourth Reich is an illegal VAT-monger confederation that has no voted constitution, a flag no one salutes, an anthem no one sings, a Fuehrer no one can name, a parliament of prostitutes, a capital of huge bureaucracy no one controls, a currency that soon will not exist, rules of fiscal behavior that no member has been penalized for ignoring, a commission which is the Eldorado of corruption, brutal cybercops, 24% VAT, and kleptocrats galore! 

“Who is the King?” is a fairly simple effort asking Brlgians to choose their monarch—Philippe or the Burger King. If one picks the sandwich chain, the site brings up an image of a voting booth and invites fans to share their choice on social media. If one attempts to choose King Phillipe, things get a bit more complicated.

On one’s first attempt to to do so, the site asks, “Are you sure you want to pick King Philippe? He won’t be making you fries.” Your second attempt brings another “Are you sure?” And on the third go-around, the copy reads “Are you definitely sure?” and hypes a one-euro Whopper deal while the “Oui” button shrinks and darts away from the users’s mouse. In other words, the site completely prevents you from choosing the real king over the Burger King.

In Fourth Reich, there is a cultural war of dagos versus squareheads.  Dagos of South Europe are lazy, addicted to dolce vita, destroyed by VAT, and fooled by kleptocrats.  Squareheads of North Europe are hard-working responsible people, producing most industrial goods.  Squareheads have large incomes, and they go for vacation to the lands of dagos.  Since dagos pay 24% VAT, their tiny incomes disappear fast.  The perpetual misery cycle of dagos will eventually lead to a real revolution against kleptocracy and VAT. Europe’s Patriot Spring is just beginning!

The European cosmopolitan elites are creating a new European man, homo bruxellarum, someone who would be entirely deprived of his roots in individual nation-states. Migrants are believed to become the ideal input in the future pan-European society, hence, the more of them, the better. This thinking has become another driving force behind the current migration deadlock.

A company cannot function properly in EU, because of the Value Added Tax. VAT shackles business. VAT yoke constrains sales and robs poor Europeans at gunpoint. VAT is the cacothanasia of EU! VAT destroys the economy and trade of EU. VAT is the most infamous comparative disadvantage. VAT is a very good reason to secede from Fourth Reich (EU) now.  All Europeans want VAT to be abolished right now.  Abolition of VAT is a prerequisite for Fourth Reich to recover from the current depression. Any federation that imposes VAT on its members does not deserve to live.  Vatstruck Fourthreichians are looking for a Moses to liberate them from the yoke of Brussels.

Fourth Reich is the ultimate bureaucracy! We deride Brussels bureaucrats for living in a bubble, but actually they are a bubble inside a bigger set of national governments’ bubbles – a double bubble. As a result, Brussels has completely lost touch with those it purports to serve and its structures are underhand.

It takes accountability, activism, and attack to keep bureaucracy at bay. The first antidote is to make bureaucrats properly accountable to those they serve – to keep them looking out, not in. In the UK, MPs hold weekly clinics for their local constituencies, they are grilled and challenged publicly when up for election and their expenses and increasingly tax returns are a matter of public record. Alas, this level of accountability and transparency does not exist in Brussels, and it should. Most people have no idea how Juncker actually ended up as head of the commission, or what he does in that role.

The second antidote is to encourage activism – to give voice and opportunity to those at the bottom to challenge those at the top. This principle is set in stone in most democracies, and you see it happening outside the houses of parliament, through e-petitions, and with the emergence of new political parties. But Brussels falls short on this dimension as well: perhaps the double-bubble is just too hard for activists to penetrate – perhaps the lack of accountability neuters the power of activism. Nigel Farage has been haranguing Juncker in the European assembly for years, but the insults and challenges don’t seem to stick.

The topic is particularly testy because, in 1950, angry post-World War II Belgian citizens forced Philippe’s grandfather, Leopold III, to abdicate the throne in favor of his son, Baudoin. Prior to that referendum, the country suffered through one of the largest general strikes in its history—the vote was largely seen as a way for the public to register its disapproval of Leopold’s actions during the Nazi occupation of Belgium. The country surrendered to Germany in 1940 after declining to join Britain and France as a member of the Allied powers.

Campaign animations, including a throne surrounded by stars and a series of trumpets bearing Belgian flags, also appear to cast the monarchy in a less-than-deferential light, though opinions vary on whether they mock the institution outright. In a separate statement to the BBC, a royal family spokesperson said that the monarchy “would not have given [its] authorization” for the campaign to use any images of Philippe for commercial purposes.”

You should never eat in restaurants, because they use a lot of salt and sugar for better taste, putting the health of their customers at risk.  By law, certain levels of rodent and insect filth are also permitted in food. Moreover, the handling of paper money brings a lot of germs to the food served. Paper money has more germs than any other substance on Earth. 

Soda consumption has been linked with diabetes, hypertension, kidney stones, and tooth decay. Cola beverages, in particular, contain phosphoric acid and have been associated with urinary changes that promote kidney stones.

Human feces were found in Coke cans in bottling plants. The night shift at a Coca-Cola plant was disrupted when a container of cans clogged up the machines, only for workers to discover a number were filled with human waste! It was absolutely horrible, and the machines had to be turned off for about 15 hours to be cleaned. 

Some migrants have made that long journey in the lorry and in their desperation were forced to use the cans instead of a toilet.  Cans arrive at factories without tops on, to be filled with the fizzy drink before they are sealed and sold.

DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. Eat more fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods. Cut back on foods that are high in saturated fat, cholesterol, and trans fats. Eat more whole-grain foods, fish, poultry, and nuts. Limit sodium, sweets, sugary drinks, and red meats.

Dietary changes are used to treat certain medical conditions, rather than drugs or surgery. We can, through an altered diet or behavior, to shape the microbiome to improve health. The gut microbiome is the second genome, the first being our own.  This second genome is plastic and responsive to the way we choose to live our lives.

Addiction to fat, sugar, salt, and cola is killing you.  Medical research shows our health is greatly affected by what we eat.  Eat an abundant variety of vegetables. Choose a rainbow of fruits every day. Choose whole grains, such whole wheat bread, brown spaghetti, and brown rice. Choose fish, poultry, beans, or nuts, which contain healthful nutrients. Use olive and other plant oils in cooking, on salads, and at the table, because they reduce harmful cholesterol and are good for the heart. 

Sugar and sugary products are bad not only for your waistline, but for your brain function as well. Long-term consumption of sugar can create a wealth of neurological problems, and it can also interfere with your memory. On the other hand, sugar can also interfere with your ability to learn, this is why it is recommended to avoid pre-baked goods, sugar, corn syrup and products that are high in fructose.

Alcohol is known to harm your liver in the long run, and it also causes brain fog. Like the name suggests, brain fog refers to a feeling of mental confusion, it acts like a cloud that impacts your ability to think clearly, as well as your memory. Have you ever noticed that you cannot remember common item names, or you cannot recall certain events or you are not sure whether they were dreams or they actually happened? This might be influenced by the high alcohol intake which impacts the balance of the brain. Fortunately, these symptoms are reversible provided that you stop consuming alcohol, or you limit your intake to one or two drinks per week.

Fat and sugar aren’t simply unhealthy, but they hijack the brain in ways that resemble addictions to drugs.  Food is addictive!  Lab studies have found sugary drinks and fatty foods can produce addictive behavior. Brain scans of obese people and compulsive eaters reveal disturbances in brain reward circuits similar to those experienced by drug abusers.

Food companies now face the most drawn-out consumer safety battle since the anti-smoking movement took on the tobacco industry a generation ago.  No one disputes that obesity is a fast growing global problem. In the West, a third of adults and a fifth of teens and children are obese.

The cost to society is enormous. Moderate obesity reduces life expectancy by four years, while severe obesity shortens life expectancy by ten years. Obesity has been shown to boost the risk of heart disease, diabetes, some cancers, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, and stroke. The annual cost of treating illness associated with obesity in the West is estimated at half trillion euros.

A few years ago, Starbucks’ popular Strawberry and Crème Frappuccino got its pink color not from strawberries, but from a dye made of crushed-up cochineal insects. Vegan consumers cried foul, and mainstream media outlets picked up the story. So, Starbucks decided to stop using cochineal extract and start using lycopene to dye its drinks pink instead.

Lycopene is a red pigment found in several fruits, but strawberries are not among them. The lycopene that now colors strawberry Frappuccinos is tomato-based. The upshot: in lieu of bugs, Starbucks is using tomatoes to make its strawberry-flavored drinks look more strawberry-like. It’s a natural ingredient, but not what nature intended. Yet that part of the story didn’t garner headlines. While crushed-up bugs may alarm some people, most of us tend to take the fact of food coloring for granted.

Today, we tend to view color as an ingredient. In the food industry, color standardization meant asserting the idea of naturalness, even as manufacturers imposed a ‘natural’ color through artificial dyes.

Take butter, for example. The color of butter fluctuates, depending on the season. From early summer through early autumn, cows eat green grass, which is rich in the orange pigment beta-carotene. The pigment colors the fat in the cows’ milk, which gives the butter a golden color. But, in winter, cows don’t eat grass. Rather, they eat grain, which, unless it has been genetically modified, does not contain much beta-carotene.  Thus, winter butter is whiter than summer butter. It’s also arguably less tasty. Because the flavor of butter was richer in the summer, there was the impression that the yellow golden color was better, too. So producers started coloring their winter butter with a golden shade to make it look tasty. The color was known as June shade.

The practice dates back to at least the fourteenth century in Europe. Dairy farmers would color their butter with carrot juice and annatto, a dye derived from achiote tree seeds, to make their butter look summery all year round. Late in the nineteenth century, dye manufacturers started supplying synthetic food coloring to dairy producers for the purpose of coloring butter and cheese, which essentially spearheaded the synthetic food dye industry.

Throughout the twentieth century, consumer watchdogs and activists opposed the use of chemical additives in food, and they continue to do so today. Major companies have responded to the demand. Nestlé pledged to remove artificial color from its candy bars in 2015, for example. General Mills promised in the same year to phase out artificial colors from its cereals. And Kraft’s signature macaroni and cheese no longer comes packaged with a Day-Glo orange powder, thanks to a pledge to stop using artificial dyes (Yellow 5 and Yellow 6) in the product. Due to consumer protests against synthetic colors, the standardization of color moved from being an opportunity to being a challenge for food manufacturers. That said, color continues to be an important ingredient in packaged foods.

Here are five reasons for giving up meat:

  1. The environmental impact is huge

Livestock farming has a vast environmental footprint. It contributes to land and water degradation, biodiversity loss, acid rain, coral reef degeneration and deforestation.

Nowhere is this impact more apparent than climate change – livestock farming contributes 18% of human produced greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. This is more than all emissions from ships, planes, trucks, cars and all other transport put together.

Climate change alone poses multiple risks to health and well-being through increased risk of extreme weather events – such as floods, droughts and heatwaves – and has been described as the greatest threat to human health in the 21st century.

Reducing consumption of animal products is essential if we are to meet global greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets – which are necessary to mitigate the worst effects of climate change. 

  1. It requires masses of grain, water, and land

Meat production is highly inefficient – this is particularly true when it comes to red meat. To produce one kilogram of beef requires 25 kilograms of grain – to feed the animal – and roughly 15,000 litres of water. Pork is a little less intensive and chicken less still.

The scale of the problem can also be seen in land use: around 30% of the earth’s land surface is currently used for livestock farming. Since food, water and land are scarce in many parts of the world, this represents an inefficient use of resources.

  1. It hurts the global poor

Feeding grain to livestock increases global demand and drives up grain prices, making it harder for the world’s poor to feed themselves. Grain could instead be used to feed people, and water used to irrigate crops.

If all grain were fed to humans instead of animals, we could feed an extra 3.5 billion people. In short, industrial livestock farming is not only inefficient but also not equitable.

  1. It causes unnecessary animal suffering

If we accept, as many people do, that animals are sentient creatures whose needs and interests matter, then we should ensure these needs and interests are at least minimally met and that we do not cause them to suffer unnecessarily.

Industrial livestock farming falls well short of this minimal standard. Most meat, dairy and eggs are produced in ways that largely or completely ignore animal welfare – failing to provide sufficient space to move around, contact with other animals, and access to the outdoors.

In short, industrial farming causes animals to suffer without good justification.

  1. It is making us ill

At the production level, industrial livestock farming relies heavily on antibiotic use to accelerate weight gain and control infection – in the US, 80% of all antibiotics are consumed by the livestock industry.

This contributes to the growing public health problem of antibiotic resistance. Already, more than 23,000 people are estimated to die every year in the US alone from resistant bacteria. As this figure continues to rise, it becomes hard to overstate the threat of this emerging crisis.

High meat consumption – especially of red and processed meat – typical of most rich industrialized countries is linked with poor health outcomes, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and various cancers.

These diseases represent a major portion of the global disease burden so reducing consumption could offer substantial public health benefits.

Currently, the average meat intake for someone living in a high-income country is 200-250g a day, far higher than the 80-90g recommended by the United Nations. Switching to a more plant-based diet could save up to 8 million lives a year worldwide by 2050 and lead to healthcare related savings and avoided climate change damages of up to $1.5 trillion.

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