SPANIARDS TRY TO FORGET THE HUGE POLITICAL CORRUPTION BY GETTING DRUNK!

 

Spaniards try to forget the huge political corruption by getting drunk! Ask Spaniards abroad what they miss most about home and you’re likely to get three answers: the weather, mum’s cooking and “la marcha” – Spain’s exciting social life. Bar culture is an essential part of Spanish people’s day-to-day routine, with more bars and restaurants per capita than any other country in the world. It’s where families and friends meet to eat, drink and chat to their hearts’ content. If you are a GUIRI (foreigner) and you want to be cool, then you should get to know the bar culture.

 

The rain of bribes in Spain brings many political corruption scandals. The heavy rain of bribes in Spain stays mainly in the plain of politics! Hardly a week goes by in Spain without a new corruption case breaking. Politicians across the political spectrum, from party treasurers to local councilors are always embroiled in graft scandals. Not to mention bankers, real estate bigwigs, and the Spanish royal family. On average, ten people are arrested each day in Spain as part of corruption investigations and the country now ranks as one of the most corrupt in Europe.

Key figures in Mariano Rajoy’s Popular Party fixed public tenders worth billions of euros. The scandals have the scale, ambition, and shock value of the Godfather, plus a gang leader, Francisco Correa, who prided himself on the nickname Don Vito after Marlon Brando’s character in Coppola’s classic. Gürtel was the codename given to the investigation. It means strap in German, and the Spanish word for strap is correa.

Nevertheless, extremely corrupt Mariano Rajoy believes the time is right for Spain to reclaim its place at the EU’s top table, reversing more than a decade of decaying Spanish influence in Brussels just in time for Brexit negotiations. After an economic crisis that wiped 10 percent off its economic output, and almost a year of political instability following two inconclusive elections, Spain now has a fully functioning government and one of the strongest growth rates in EU. Corrupt Rajoy now touts his country as a reliable partner for EU, offer advice on how to fight populism by delivering growth, and defend the role of moderate parties in shoring up the European project.

Spain, which last played a prominent role on the larger European stage in the first years of the 21st century, returns to a different kind of Europe, riven by crises and doubts. It is hardly clear what domestic stability and any renewed influence could be used to accomplish at the European level, beyond making a stronger play for top jobs in Brussels and strengthening the ranks of firmly pro-EU countries. The cloud of a Catalan push for independence could also prematurely end a period of relative domestic tranquility.

Still for the time being, the extremely corrupt government is presenting this Spain as a solid bastion of pro-European values and moderate policies the EU can count on in these uncertain times. Corrupt ministers are marketing Spain as a case study on how to boost the economy and reign in extremism at a time of rising populism across the Continent and political uncertainty. Spain is almost alone in Europe in having no anti-EU political forces in parliament, and corrupt Rajoy doesn’t have to call an election until 2020, though his corrupt Popular Party only has a third of the seats in parliament, potentially limiting his ability to negotiate in Brussels.

 “Our international presence was affected by the long period of interim government,” Rajoy told us. “We now have to catch up … and the circumstances are especially favorable for it.”

We have left behind a period in which Spain was perceived as a problem for Europe. Now it is the project of European building that is going through a problematic phase and it is Spain that is ready to contribute to relaunch it. The European Commission and the European Council have asked corrupt Spain to play a bigger role in EU affairs.

The most obvious symptom of its declining influence in Brussels is the lack of Spanish officials in key EU posts — quite a come-down for a country that had three corrupt presidents of the European Parliament between 1989 and 2007, not to mention Javier Solana in the post of EU foreign policy chief from 1999 to 2009 and Pedro Solbes and Joaquín Almunia in top economic jobs in the Commission from 1999 to 2014. Spain’s current representative on the Commission, Miguel Arias Cañete, is the more junior of two commissioners dealing with the energy portfolio.

A survey by the European Council on Foreign Relations showed that of the six largest EU member countries, Spain played the most marginal role in EU affairs. Pundits in Spain pin the responsibility for this state of affairs not just on corrupt Rajoy’s government, but previous corrupt Spanish prime ministers too.

Spain’s clout in Brussels started declining during the second mandate of the conservative José María Aznar (1996-2004) when he changed foreign policy direction and supported the war in Iraq, alienating France and Germany. The situation continued to deteriorate under the Socialist leadership of José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero (2004-2011), with his focus on the United Nations and lack of interest in forging alliances on the Continent.

One problem facing Spain as it seeks to make up for lost time in Brussels is the absence of a leader like Felipe González. Spain joined the EU in 1986 under Felipe González, a time widely seen as the peak of Spanish influence in the EU. This had much to do with González’s personality and his talent in face-to-face meetings, which allowed him to forge strong alliances with the likes of Germany’s Helmut Kohl.

Ok, so your PEÑA (crowd) has pulled your arm and convinced you to SALIR DE MARCHA (go out partying).

You stumble into a BARETO (boozer) and kick off a crazy night with a round of CHUPITOS (shots).

The bar is CAÑERO (jumping/lively) so you all order a CUBATA (a spirit with a mixer) and a CAÑA (beer).

By the time you’ve downed your drink you decide to try your luck at PILLAR CACHO (get some action) by managing to ENTRAR A (chat up) UNA TÍA (bird/ chick) whose TÍO (bloke/ guy)has gone to the toilet.

You shout out MENUDA CLAVADA (what a rip off) when the barman overcharges you, taking advantage of your drunken state.

You quickly head out to SACAR PELAS (withdraw money) but you keep an eye out for CHORIZOS (thieves) who might want to pickpocket you.

It all turns into a bit of a blur when you join a BOTELLÓN (big booze up outside in the streets or squares) and run off home when the MONOS (Police) chase the crowd off…

The next day you have a killer RESACA (hangover) but you have to CURRAR (work). It’s your turn to PRINGAR (slog it out) and you only have yourself to blame. Still, what a night!

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