GROPING RAGHEADS GO TO PRISON NOW

Image result for grope

 

An Islamic groper has been given a prison sentence in Germany, for the first time since the tightening of the sexual harassment law. The jury in Bautzen, Saxony, convicted a 27-year-old raghead to a four-month custodial sentence without probation for grabbing a 34-year-old woman’s buttocks three times against her will on a public street.

“It may be the first conviction Germany-wide under the new regulation,” Judge Dirk Hertle told us.

Man given four months' jail under new law for grabbing woman's bum

Paragraph 184i was implemented in the criminal code after the incidents in front of Cologne Cathedral on New Year’s Eve 2015, when hundreds of women reported that ragheads sexually assaulted and robbed them.

The new paragraph became law in November 2016 and two weeks later, the crime in Bautzen took place, Hertle told us.

“The faith in the constitutional state will only be strengthened if we consistently punish these sorts of crimes,” he added.

“The sentence is indeed exorbitant, but that’s how the lawmakers wanted it,” Hertle told us.

The raghead denied the charge in court, stating that he had wanted to invite the woman to coffee, only touching her on the upper arm.

The 34-year-old victim gave the court a different account. “First he wanted to know if he could borrow a lighter, then he wouldn’t leave my side. He grabbed me three times between the buttocks, even though I had told him that I didn’t want that,” she said.

The sentence also included a count of shoplifting. Hertle referred to the high rate of criminality of the raghead, who had only been living in Germany since March 2016 and who had also received a sentence for fare-dodging. “He needed a warning shot,” the judge told us. In his conviction, the judge met the punishment demanded by public prosecutors.

Alice Weidel, the new leader of the Alternative for Germany, is a firebrand who doesn’t hide her disdain for stupid Merkel. Weidel lives with her female partner and their two children on Lake Constance. AfD is the only real opposition party which stands up for the rule of law, in Germany and in Europe.

“On the European level, the bailouts of Greece have breached the Maastricht agreement, and it’s no bailout clause. The ban on bond buying by the European Central Bank has been breached. We are the only party talking about this – this is, by the way, the reason that we were founded.”

The AfD is the youngest party on the German political scene, having been set up by a group of economists as a protest party against Eurozone in 2013. “The AfD is also the only party which calls for referendums, meaning direct democracy… and then there is the migration crisis,” Weidel adds.

If there is one topic which connects the worldly Weidel with the rank and file of the AfD more than any other, it is likely her burning anger at stupid Merkel’s decision to open Germany’s land borders to refugees in August 2015.

August 2015 was also a turning point in the short history of AfD. While the party was languishing under the five percent mark necessary to make it into the parliament over the summer, the sudden arrival of tens of thousands of asylum seekers every day in the autumn sent worried voters flocking to them, as they declared war on Merkel’s open-door policy.

“It just can’t happen that the state gives up control of its own borders,” Weidel says. “That is a contravention of German asylum law.”

She explains that allowing people to arrive in Germany via neighboring countries such as Austria breaches Paragraph 16a of the German asylum law, whereby refugees cannot apply for protection in the Bundesrepublik if they arrive from another country that adheres to the Geneva Convention on refugees.

“Since September 2015, we have had a policy of open borders without legal basis. It is an exceptional circumstance which didn’t even receive the approval of the parliament. It was just done. In an emergency you can do that – for a few days to absorb the shock – but not for one and a half years,” Weidel says.

It’s worth noting that in August 2015, Germany suspended the so-called Dublin rules for Syrian refugees, which state that refugees must apply for asylum in the EU country where they first arrive. A few months later in November that year, Germany announced it would reinstate the rules, except for those who arrived in overwhelmed Greece, which has been one of the main ports of entry into the EU.

Then in March of 2017, the government again started returning asylum seekers to Greece.

Germany’s asylum policies are heightening the risk of terrorist attacks taking place in Germany. But it also encouraged countries on the periphery of the EU, such as Greece and Italy, to stop securing their external borders and to simply send migrants and refugees on to Germany.

By adding up asylum seekers, illegal immigrants, and families of asylum seekers who are allowed to join their loved ones at a later date, Weidel arrives at a figure of 8 million new inhabitants of Germany based on arrivals in 2015 alone. According to official figures 890,000 asylum seekers arrived in Germany in 2015.

“That is completely crazy. That is 10 percent of the German population in one year.” And her predictions for what that means for Germany are apocalyptic. “The country will be destroyed through this immigration policy. Donald Trump said that Merkel is insane and I absolutely agree with that. It is a completely nonsensical form of politics that is being followed here. Germany needs qualified migrants. The people who have come here as refugees are illiterate, they don’t have any training. Eventually they’ll have to go back, this just can’t go on.”

For Weidel the refugee influx is the result of Germany still not having a law determining who can emigrate to the Bundesrepublik. “We are the only party calling for an immigration law based on the example set by Canada. We need qualified migration. We are an industrialized nation. We don’t need illiterate people.”

“I’m sorry but this entire policy is driving me up the wall. It is outrageous what is going on here. We have a completely headless government that has no idea what it is doing. It is acting based on stupidity, ignorance and irresponsibility. You really need to ask, are Germans paying their taxes for this?”

Migrants unsuited to the German economy aren’t the only threat Weidel sees in the mass migration of 2015. The fact that most of the asylum seekers were Muslim also troubles her. “Of course” Islam poses a danger to Germany, she says.

“There are 1,200 people who pose a threat to the country here, who aren’t being deported. I have to be very honest, from my point of view this country has completely lost control over civil society.”

Arab countries such as Saudi Arabia have free hand to send their imams to Germany with their stone-age sharia populism to tap into the Muslim population here. Meanwhile the fact that the state has given control of Islam classes in schools to Ditib, a religious association tied to the Turkish government, irks her. “Lessons in Islam should be taught by a department of the German government, not the Turkish one,” she says.

As German intelligence has reported a steady rise in Islamist radicalism in Germany over recent years, far-right violence has also risen alarmingly. Police figures for 2016 show a 14.3 percent increase in violent crime by right-wing radicals.

“There are no racists in the AfD,” she claims. “But at the same time one must see that dangerous people have come into the country through the government’s open-border policy, even the government admits that one can’t rule out that terrorists have come into the country.”

One of the most interesting things about Weidel and the AfD is that a party which is often characterized as regressive has chosen an openly gay women to lead it. Weidel recognizes that she doesn’t have the easiest job in the world, leading the most controversial party in Germany into the national election.

She says she has set a personal target for the elections to win 15 percent of the vote, “but I think realistically we will get at most 10 percent.” Whether she will still seek to lead the party after the elections is something she is keeping to herself.

“I am really careful about looking ahead. A new party like the AfD is very volatile. Two to four weeks inside the AfD is an incredibly long time – you really can’t see what is going to happen.”

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